The 1952 presidential campaign was the catalyst that resulted in the establishment of the Culver City Democratic Club. A group of interested citizens met to listen to radio broadcasts of Adlai Stevenson’s speeches. While Stevenson lost to Eisenhower, the Club survived, providing a new vehicle for political expression here in Culver City.

In 1953 the Los Angeles County Democratic Central Committee issued the club a charter. In addition to its involvement in national and state issues, the club was very active on the local political scene. Members petitioned the city for streetlights and sewers, and they were successful. The Club also participated actively in the successful campaign to increase pay for Culver City Police and Firemen.

In 1954 the Club participated in the first California Democratic Council pre-primary endorsing convention. The CDC is a grass-roots movement that was to be a powerful political force in the state throughout the 50′s, 60′s and 70′s. During that time, every Democratic candidate for office sought the group’s endorsement. While the CDC’s influence diminshed somewhat in the 90′s, over the last two years the organization’s membership, effectiveness and influence have increased significantly. Democratic clubs, through the CDC, reached the peak of their popularity and strength in 1958. Pat Brown was endorsed, nominated and elected Governor of the State of California. Many people active in the club movement were appointed to statewide offices, commissions, judgeships, and even positions within the Governor’s cabinet.

Throughout the years, the Culver City Democratic Club has been a vital force in electing candidates to local office, as well as to state and national positions. Many members of Culver City’s City Council have been members of the Club, including four of the five current Councilmembers. With your help, the Club will continue to be an influential force for Democratic principles on all levels of government.

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